Terim Season 1 Review – A celebratory look at a legendary Turkish manager

Episode Guide

Episode 1
Episode 2
Episode 3
Episode 4

 

Another month, another football documentary hits our screens. This time though it comes in the form of a real Turkish delight on Netfix, Terim. This four-part docu-series looks at the illustrious manager Fatih Terim, chronicling his journey from former player to successful manager.

With extensive interviews from Terim himself, alongside club presidents, players and family members, this autobiographical look at Terim’s career is very much a celebratory look at what this man managed to accomplish after hanging up his boots.

The story is basically split between four different chapters, which are broken up nicely by the 50 minute long episodes. The first sees Terim become Galatasary’s manager, changing up the way the team plays and leading them on to multiple league titles.

From here, the seocnd episode tackles the Champions League before cycling through to Terim’s time in Serie A and, eventually, moving over to his management of the Turkish national team. There’s a particular focus on their infamous run back in 2008 before switching the focus back to Galatasaray again,

Most of the episodes mix up archival footage of old matches, although those are used sparingly, as the majority of the focus here remains on Terim. In fact, the man himself lends extensive knowledge of his era, admitting early on that he’s actually doing this so he can look back at everything he’s accomplished with fondness.

Of course, this approach is a bit of a double-edged sword as it also means that any negative aspects of Terim’s management style or controversial aspects of his career are glossed over a bit.

Despite that though, the series do well to chronicle this man’s amazing journey with various different teams, highlight the impressive job he did with Galatasaray in particular. Of course, because of the “talky” nature of this documentary, it could put some people off, especially those expecting a more immersive experience akin to the All or Nothing series.

Aesthetically, Terim doesn’t really do all that much differently to other series of this nature, although some of the archival photos are nicely implemented, especially with the crowd cheer sound effects over the top.

With each episode tackling a different part of Terim’s management tenure, there’s more than enough in this series to make for an engaging watch. Terim isn’t the best football documentary released this year, but it’s entertaining and insightful enough to stick with over the 4 episodes.


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